SEVA OR THE UNINTERESTED SEVICE

“Living things feed on food, and food feeds on rain, rain is likewise the water of life, which comes from worship and selfless service.” - Bhagavad Gita In Sanskrit language there is a word that means serving others in a selfless way: it’s called Seva. Service to others is a very important concept in Hindu philosophy. It is an act of love, compassion and caring for others and oneself. The sacred text Bhagavad Gita encourages the service of others as a way of developing spiritually, since in Hinduism, when you are serving others, you are actually serving God. “O son of Prtha, there is no work prescribed for Me within all the three planetary systems. Nor am I in want of anything, nor have I need to obtain anything—and yet I am engaged in work. For, if I did not engage in work, O Partha, certainly all men would follow My path. If I should cease to work, then all these worlds would be put to ruination. I would also be the cause of creating unwanted population, and I would thereby destroy the peace of all sentient beings. As the ignorant perform their duties with attachment to results, similarly the learned may also act, but without attachment, for the sake of leading people on the right path.” Performing Seva is a task that poses a lot of challenges. Certain aspects of service to others can bring up difficulties or brakes and, in working them, become a powerful tool for people to learn more about themselves and, from here, interconnect with the community, creating a constantly evolving network, based on the culture of kindness and cooperation. That is why the Community Service is one of the four pillars of the Sa Llavor Foundation. In this way, children learn the value of service to others and understand education as a way for social transformation.

2020-02-05T08:49:57+00:00 February 4th, 2020|

VOLUNTEER GROUPS

“The Buddhist point of view takes the function of work to be at least threefold: to give a man a chance to utilise and develop his faculties; to enable him to overcome his ego-centredness by joining with other people in a common task; and to bring forth the goods and services needed for a becoming existence” - Small is beautiful: Economics as if people mattered. E. F. Schumacher In the Foundation we have already started the Volunteer Groups, a project developed together with the team of delegates with the aim of creating a channel and a space for collaboration between the Foundation and families. Each group will be self-managed, will have a coordinator by the school and one by the families and will be dedicated to a specific task: cleaning, restoration, library, garden and forest, maintenance, creative processes and events. Many of these groups are already active and functioning and others need more volunteer hands. From the Foundation we firmly believe in a circular economy project where the whole community can benefit from the project, donating their time, but also receiving workshops, training, knowledge and a space of connection with themselves and with others.

2020-02-04T13:15:11+00:00 February 4th, 2020|

PRESENTATION OF SA LLAVOR EDICIONS

Sa Llavor Edicions was born as a result of the exchange of books between two people who knew each other through their love for reading. Books accompany us on the road through life; they are a fundamental part of the integral development of the human being. Books make us laugh and cry, they calm us, they make us love and put us in harmony with the world. Reading, as a tool to know the other, to understand the strangers, to be able to put ourselves in their place and to love them. Now Sa Llavor Edicions opens up to the entire community and invites us to participate in the project in the best possible way: reading and sharing the love for books! "Stories to be told" contest Sa Llavor Edicions presents the first edition of this oral narrative contest with the objective of promoting literary creation and boost the art of story telling in the community. The contest will be held on Thursday, April 23rd, the day of Sant Jordi. During this day, the stories selected by the jury will be presented in public, accompanied, if necessary, by instruments. We encourage everyone to participate! You have until April 1st to submit your proposals. Contest rules in catalan, spanish and english here> Collection of second-hand books Also during the day of Sant Jordi, and inspired by the circular economy, Sa Llavor Edicions is going to organize a free second-hand book exchange market in the school garden. If you have books to give to the market about literature, essay, poetry and theater, as well as children's stories that are in good condition, you can leave them in the Foundation's Hivernacle from March 15th. Thank you!

2020-02-04T13:02:35+00:00 February 4th, 2020|

NATURE’S GIFTS

I often went alone. Sometimes, lost in amazement, I went deep into the woods, and I imagined that I was Mowgli, the character of Rudyard Kipling, the child raised by the wolves, so I took off almost all the clothes for the climb. If I climbed to a sufficient height, the branches grew thinner to the point that, if the wind blew, the world would lean down and then up. It was scary and it was wonderful to surrender to the power of the wind. My senses were filled with the sensation of falling, of climbing, of swinging; Around me the leaves split like fingers and the wind came in sighs and hoarse whispers. The wind also brought scents, and the tree itself certainly released its perfumes faster when the gusts blew. Finally, there was only the wind that moved between all things. Now, when the days of climbing trees have long passed, I often think of the lasting value of those first days of sweet laziness. I have come to appreciate the wide view offered by the tops of those trees. Nature calmed me, focused and at the same time excited my senses. Last Child in the Woods. Richard Louv

2020-01-13T12:56:47+00:00 January 13th, 2020|

LIBRARY: CONNECTION WITH LIFE

We present a selection of texts that inspire the team of Sa Llavor and share in the weekly meetings as part of their pedagogical path. Fragment extracted from the book “A new Earth” by Eckhart Tolle. Seeing beauty in a flower could awaken humans, however briefly, to the beauty that is an essential part of their own innermost being, their true nature. The first recognition of beauty was one of the most significant events in the evolution of human consciousness. The feelings of joy and love are intrinsically connected to that recognition. Without our fully realizing it, flowers would become for us an expression in form of that which is most high, most sacred, and ultimately formless within ourselves. Flowers, more fleeting, more ethereal, and more delicate than the plants out of which they emerged, would become like messengers from another realm, like a bridge between the world of physical forms and the formless. They not only had a scent that was delicate and pleasing to humans, but also brought a fragrance from the realm of spirit. Using the word "enlightenment" in a wider sense than the conventionally accepted one, we could look upon flowers as the enlightenment of plants. Any life-form in any realm—mineral, vegetable, animal, or human—can be said to undergo "enlightenment." It is, however, an extremely rare occurrence since it is more than an evolutionary progression: It also implies a discontinuity in its development, a leap to an entirely different level of Being and, most importantly, a lessening of materiality. What could be heavier and more impenetrable than a rock, the densest of all forms? And yet some rocks undergo a change in their molecular structure, turn into crystals, and so become transparent to the light. Some carbons, under inconceivable heat and pressure, turn into diamonds, and some heavy minerals into other precious stones. Most crawling reptilians, the most earthbound of all creatures, have remained unchanged for millions of years. Some, however, grew feathers and wings and turned into birds, thus defying the force of gravity that had held them for so long. They didn't become better at crawling or walking, but transcended crawling and walking entirely. Since time immemorial, flowers, crystals, precious stones, and birds have held special significance for the human spirit. Like all life-forms, they are, of course, temporary manifestations of the underlying one Life, one Consciousness.

2020-01-13T12:52:29+00:00 January 13th, 2020|

EMBRACE THE SOLSTICE

During these dates, the animal kingdom and the nature that surrounds us begin the time of hibernation. Exhausted bodies seek heat, darkness and silence. The trees lose their leaves. The forests remain silent. It is a time to descend and rest, to assimilate, from calm and stillness, everything that has happened during this year that ends. But what happens around us? Lights, noise, traffic, consumption ... It seems that they want to drag us to the opposite place to which the body asks us. Let us then embrace the sense of solstice. Let's get carried away by this natural tendency that pushes us to go inward, as all creatures do. The cold is only bitter if we are far from the heat of our homes. If we follow the smooth and calm path towards our inner feelings we will see how winter, in fact, is kind since it allows us to enter the darkness of ourselves, listening, accepting and loving. Winter eliminates distractions, noise and presents the perfect time to rest and retire. Then it will restart all over again with the new year, and as a seed planted in the depths of the earth, we will rise with renewed energies once again to run, laugh and dance under the sunlight. Enjoy winter and happy advent to everyone.

2019-12-15T15:58:58+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

LIBRARY: FREEEDOM III

We present a selection of texts that inspire the team of Sa Llavor and share in the weekly meetings as part of their pedagogical path. JOSEPH BEUYS, "Every man an artist." Conversations in Documenta V (1972). Compiled by Clara Bodenmann-Ritter. Over a hundred days, Joseph Beuys spoke and discussed "social plastic", an expanded concept of art that would lead us to a new model of society and the world, in whose center is the creative human being, the art and creativity as the only revolutionary forces. ... Question: So what you do is a direct political action? Answers Joseph Beuys: No, for me it is an artistic action. Because that artistic concept is designed to make the self-determination demanded by democracy be seen as the possibility. There are many people who say "yes, well, but the human being cannot determine himself, he has no internal freedom." So what we want to discuss is a science of freedom. We want to start more and more of self-determination, of human freedom as a creative starting point, that is, artistic. So it is a cultural issue first of all. And also, a matter of education and parenting in general, right?. So we do not start from the means of production, but from the freedom of the human being as a creative creature that determines itself, and there we find the primary means of production that acts in history and creates the future. To that extent, it is a complement of Marxism, a necessary complement. Q: It is the principle of humanism. JB: Yes, I would say of a libertarian humanism. And in saying that, that concept of freedom naturally refers to the free individual. And in that case it is not necessary to use the word humanism at all, because that is basically the human question: the human being who determines himself as a free individual, and shapes the next phase of history. P: Yes, I would say... JB: Precisely creativity in self-determination; and that means that I have to take responsibility now. I have to participate, cooperate. I can no longer live selfishly just for myself. Q: But there are many people who don't want that. JB: Sure. But on the other hand it is important to make humans try as it is because they know, as if we were saying, that they really take the taste to live as human beings when they do not think selfishly, but live, why not say it? Christianly , that is, nothing for me, all for others. And that is much more exciting than taking drugs, isn't it? Let them prove the experiences that living like this provides.

2019-12-13T11:57:11+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

ARÁNZAZU PLAZA INTERVIEW

"Nature is a medecine" Aránzazu Plaza is a counselor and therapist specialized in learning, integration and behavior difficulties, trained in INPP to address Neuromotor Immaturity, formed in Waldorf Pedagogy, Waldorf Support Pedagogy and Waldorf Emergency and Trauma Pedagogy, formed in Pedagogy Pickler, University Specialist in Systemic Family Therapy, Social Educator, Anthropologist, trained in humanist therapies, Enneagram and Gestalt, trainer of trainers, she is currently part of the teaching team of the Waldorf Support Pedagogy training in Spain and the Madre de Día training team of the Waldorf house in Alicante, and is also a pedagogical advisor for several schools linked to the Waldorf pedagogy. This course has begun its collaboration with the Fundació Sa Llavor. Question: When did your interest in pedagogy start? Aránzazu: Since I went to school. I loved attending classes. In summer I was one of those who wanted to go back to school. Did you receive a Waldorf education? No. I studied EGB in the 70s and the curriculum was quite nice with childhood. In the sense that we did many things with our hands: we wove, we built electronic circuits, we drew, we painted and in the playground we played with dirt, sticks, stones, water, mud ... Now most of the playgrounds or parks are covered in cement. And your social vein? When did it arise? In sixth grade I moved to a religious school. There I decided that I wanted to be a missionary. Either I played to teach or I played to help someone. What were your favourite subjects? Mathematics and philosophy. I was determined to be a teacher of one of that two subjects. Then, in COU, I went to see a school counselor, who actually disoriented me. How are you going to get to teach with your qualifications? You are going to be an engineer. But I didn't want to be an engineer, I wanted to teach. You had a strong vocation... Yes, but he told me, if you study engineering you can teach math, physics, drawing ... So I got into telecommunications engineering. But then I went through the eighteen-years old crisis... And what happened? I always volunteered, and at that time I was volunteering teaching how to read and to write to gypsy men who wanted to get a driving license... I loved it. So I left engineering and began to study social work, but always with a vocation in education. How did you discover Waldorf pedagogy? One day a friend told me: you have to train in Waldorf pedagogy, because you are already a Waldorf pedagogue and you don't know it. And that is what I did. I studied Waldorf pedagogy for teachers. The classroom experience was fine but I really wanted to make accessible Waldorf pedagogy to girls and boys with difficulties. Then I did the Waldorf Support Training and there I found myself as a fish in water. And you discovered the INPP (Institute of Neuro-Physiological Psychology) ... One of my Waldorf support pedagogy teachers was

2019-12-16T14:44:47+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

OPEN DOORS DAY

On Saturday, November 30th we celebrate the Open doors day at the Sa Llavor Foundation from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. It will be a day to share with the family and to open the doors of our home to the entire community. There will be workshops for all ages, storytelling, craft market, books and pedagogical material sale, exhibitions of works made by students, vegetarian and organic food, music, school guided tours for new families and many more surprises. Schedule of activities: 11'00 a.m. Doors opening 11'15 a.m. Musical opening 11:30 a.m. Guided tour / Family workshops 1'15 p.m. Storytelling 1'30 p.m. Organic and vegetarian restaurant service 3'15 p.m. Musical closing 3'30 p.m. Closing

2019-11-27T07:41:49+00:00 November 11th, 2019|

LIBRARY: FREEDOM II

We present a selection of texts that inspire the team of Sa Llavor and share in the weekly meetings as part of their pedagogical path.   Tale extracted from the “Spiritual Compass” book by Satish Kumar. There was a fisherman lying on the beach, dozing in the sun. The catch of the day was over and, after lunch, it was time to rest. A merchant saw him lying languidly and asked him: "How come you don't work today?" “I have already finished my work. This morning I went out with my little boat, caught some fish, sold some and cooked others and ate them; Now it's time to rest, nap time”, said the fisherman. "But you could still catch some more fish, right?", asked the merchant. "And why would I do it?", asked the fisherman surprised. "This way you would earn more money and you could buy a larger motor boat, which could load larger nets and catch more fish”, the merchant replied. "For what?”, asked the fisherman. "Well, that way you could have a fleet of ships, create a company, and when it succeeds, sell it and earn a lot of money," said the merchant. "And then what?" Asked the fisherman, without understanding anything. "Then you could retire and be all day lying on the beach, without worries," the merchant insisted. “But it is precisely what I am doing now! The future does not worry me. I am happy, very happy, what I have satisfies me. I feel lucky with the sea, with sunlight and with a lot of time to enjoy life. Why should I try so hard? ” The merchant, who at first did not know what to say, soon walked away smiling.   Fragment of the book “Verdolatry. Nature teaches us to be human ”by Santiago Beruete. “We still have to learn the art of living in a world oversaturated with information. And we must also learn the even more difficult art of preparing the next generations to live in such a world. ” Zygmunt Bauman. Pedagogy is a branch of gardening, so educating is another meaning of the word cultivate. We are all plants and gardeners. We cultivate each other. The true meaning of teaching is "sowing the spirits," as Plato states by Socrates in the Fedro dialogue. The teacher's words are seeds, but they will only germinate if they fall on fertile soil. The same raises the crucial question of how to prepare the ground. Gardening and education are humble professions. Those who sow the earth and those who cultivate the spirit have something in common: the sweat of their brow will not bear fruit until after a while. Teaching is like planting: you are never sure if the effort will bear fruit, if the seed you spread will sprout, but that emotion brings into play the best of the human being: hope, trust, patience, perseverance, tenacity and, of course, humility. Nothing worthwhile is achieved in life without these qualities. It goes without saying

2019-11-11T09:39:30+00:00 November 11th, 2019|