EMBRACE THE SOLSTICE

During these dates, the animal kingdom and the nature that surrounds us begin the time of hibernation. Exhausted bodies seek heat, darkness and silence. The trees lose their leaves. The forests remain silent. It is a time to descend and rest, to assimilate, from calm and stillness, everything that has happened during this year that ends. But what happens around us? Lights, noise, traffic, consumption ... It seems that they want to drag us to the opposite place to which the body asks us. Let us then embrace the sense of solstice. Let's get carried away by this natural tendency that pushes us to go inward, as all creatures do. The cold is only bitter if we are far from the heat of our homes. If we follow the smooth and calm path towards our inner feelings we will see how winter, in fact, is kind since it allows us to enter the darkness of ourselves, listening, accepting and loving. Winter eliminates distractions, noise and presents the perfect time to rest and retire. Then it will restart all over again with the new year, and as a seed planted in the depths of the earth, we will rise with renewed energies once again to run, laugh and dance under the sunlight. Enjoy winter and happy advent to everyone.

2019-12-15T15:58:58+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

LAST DAY OF THE FIRST QUARTER

On Friday, December 20th, the first quarter ends and Christmas holidays begin. To celebrate it we have prepared a brief Christmas show. This is the schedule: 8:30 am Entrance of students 10'45h Opening of doors for families 11'00h Artistic performance of the students of Sa Llavor for families 12'00h Students collection and delivery of work.

2019-12-15T16:01:14+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

LIBRARY: FREEEDOM III

We present a selection of texts that inspire the team of Sa Llavor and share in the weekly meetings as part of their pedagogical path. JOSEPH BEUYS, "Every man an artist." Conversations in Documenta V (1972). Compiled by Clara Bodenmann-Ritter. Over a hundred days, Joseph Beuys spoke and discussed "social plastic", an expanded concept of art that would lead us to a new model of society and the world, in whose center is the creative human being, the art and creativity as the only revolutionary forces. ... Question: So what you do is a direct political action? Answers Joseph Beuys: No, for me it is an artistic action. Because that artistic concept is designed to make the self-determination demanded by democracy be seen as the possibility. There are many people who say "yes, well, but the human being cannot determine himself, he has no internal freedom." So what we want to discuss is a science of freedom. We want to start more and more of self-determination, of human freedom as a creative starting point, that is, artistic. So it is a cultural issue first of all. And also, a matter of education and parenting in general, right?. So we do not start from the means of production, but from the freedom of the human being as a creative creature that determines itself, and there we find the primary means of production that acts in history and creates the future. To that extent, it is a complement of Marxism, a necessary complement. Q: It is the principle of humanism. JB: Yes, I would say of a libertarian humanism. And in saying that, that concept of freedom naturally refers to the free individual. And in that case it is not necessary to use the word humanism at all, because that is basically the human question: the human being who determines himself as a free individual, and shapes the next phase of history. P: Yes, I would say... JB: Precisely creativity in self-determination; and that means that I have to take responsibility now. I have to participate, cooperate. I can no longer live selfishly just for myself. Q: But there are many people who don't want that. JB: Sure. But on the other hand it is important to make humans try as it is because they know, as if we were saying, that they really take the taste to live as human beings when they do not think selfishly, but live, why not say it? Christianly , that is, nothing for me, all for others. And that is much more exciting than taking drugs, isn't it? Let them prove the experiences that living like this provides.

2019-12-13T11:57:11+00:00 December 13th, 2019|

ARÁNZAZU PLAZA INTERVIEW

"Nature is a medecine" Aránzazu Plaza is a counselor and therapist specialized in learning, integration and behavior difficulties, trained in INPP to address Neuromotor Immaturity, formed in Waldorf Pedagogy, Waldorf Support Pedagogy and Waldorf Emergency and Trauma Pedagogy, formed in Pedagogy Pickler, University Specialist in Systemic Family Therapy, Social Educator, Anthropologist, trained in humanist therapies, Enneagram and Gestalt, trainer of trainers, she is currently part of the teaching team of the Waldorf Support Pedagogy training in Spain and the Madre de Día training team of the Waldorf house in Alicante, and is also a pedagogical advisor for several schools linked to the Waldorf pedagogy. This course has begun its collaboration with the Fundació Sa Llavor. Question: When did your interest in pedagogy start? Aránzazu: Since I went to school. I loved attending classes. In summer I was one of those who wanted to go back to school. Did you receive a Waldorf education? No. I studied EGB in the 70s and the curriculum was quite nice with childhood. In the sense that we did many things with our hands: we wove, we built electronic circuits, we drew, we painted and in the playground we played with dirt, sticks, stones, water, mud ... Now most of the playgrounds or parks are covered in cement. And your social vein? When did it arise? In sixth grade I moved to a religious school. There I decided that I wanted to be a missionary. Either I played to teach or I played to help someone. What were your favourite subjects? Mathematics and philosophy. I was determined to be a teacher of one of that two subjects. Then, in COU, I went to see a school counselor, who actually disoriented me. How are you going to get to teach with your qualifications? You are going to be an engineer. But I didn't want to be an engineer, I wanted to teach. You had a strong vocation... Yes, but he told me, if you study engineering you can teach math, physics, drawing ... So I got into telecommunications engineering. But then I went through the eighteen-years old crisis... And what happened? I always volunteered, and at that time I was volunteering teaching how to read and to write to gypsy men who wanted to get a driving license... I loved it. So I left engineering and began to study social work, but always with a vocation in education. How did you discover Waldorf pedagogy? One day a friend told me: you have to train in Waldorf pedagogy, because you are already a Waldorf pedagogue and you don't know it. And that is what I did. I studied Waldorf pedagogy for teachers. The classroom experience was fine but I really wanted to make accessible Waldorf pedagogy to girls and boys with difficulties. Then I did the Waldorf Support Training and there I found myself as a fish in water. And you discovered the INPP (Institute of Neuro-Physiological Psychology) ... One of my Waldorf support pedagogy teachers was

2019-12-16T14:44:47+00:00 December 13th, 2019|